Quilting the Pumpkin Table Runner

A couple of weeks ago, I saw this blog post by Megan over at Canoe Ridge Creations. I was really intrigued by the quilting on her mini-quilt, so I just had to try it. And I had the perfect table runner for practice. This is the table runner that I made using Judy Danz’ Have a Pumpkin Good Day machine embroidery set. These applique shapes are cut with the AccuQuilt GO!™ Pumpkins die # 55323. 

Quilting was done by stitching a free-style squiggly line that was the width of my hopping foot. I just went up and down. Then I went back across filling in a squiggly line between each of the original lines. I didn’t try to match the squiggles in anyway, each was independent. The table runner looks great, was fairly easy to do, and not using a ruler with my longarm was far easier for me. I can definitely see that this would work well with free-motion quilting on a regular sewing machine as well as a longarm machine and that it may work better on smaller areas rather than going across an entire large quilt. Wouldn’t it be fun quilting for a mug rug?

Quilting wavy lines

 

This is the full runner on my kitchen table. I opened the leaves so it would lay flat.

 

This is a view at an angle so you can see the effect of the quilting and how it makes the pumpkins stand out–almost like trapunto. Quilting around the vines was a dilemma for me, and I did it a couple of different ways. The leaves were stitched in the ditch, but after awhile, I started stitching straight over the redwork stems instead of trying to stitch beside them as an outline. I really couldn’t tell that it changed the overall look and the stitches hardly showed. The thread used on this is Aurifil 50 wt in a color to match the background.

And you can see that the Irish chain squares are done with a freehand continuous curve as they’re definitely not perfectly even. The squiggly line piano keys in the border were also done free-hand. This whole thing really went fast and gave me the exact effect I wanted.

 

 

 

  
 

Crazy Hearts

Just wanted to show you some pictures of the crazy hearts quilt that I’m quilting this week. My friend, Sherry pieced this from a set of embroidery hearts I gave her. The hearts are made from crumb blocks and are cut with my AccuQuilt GO™ hearts die like this. They are cut from fabric that is randomly pieced together from scraps.

 

And then they are stitched onto background fabric with the basic hearts machine embroidery set.

And this is the way I’m quilting these. I am using this quilt to practice the swirls that I plan to use on Sherry’s bargello quilt.

 

 
 

Day 3 Machine Embroidery Blog Hop – Fall Medley

Today is Day 3 (and the day after the election) of the ME blog hop and SewCalGal has some great machine embroidery fun for you.

In addition, I’d like to share a couple of links to encourage all quilters to donate quilts to victims of the Hurricane Sandy disaster in the northeast. You can be sure that both of these organizations will deliver. Here are the links:

and

http://www.equilter.com/cgi-bin/webc.cgi/quiltrelief.html

 
 

Quilted Panels and Kindles, etc.

I found a great tutorial over on Elizabeth Hartman’s blog–have you noticed I’m a fan– showing how to make quilted panels for a structured bag. It’s a great way to make quilted fabric for a bag and a great way to use up some fabrics that are sitting around and will never be stitched into slacks or clothes because you’re too busy quilting. I recently inherited a lot of fabric like that, and now I know how it will be used. While Elizabeth made her panels on the sewing machine, I am going to try this on the longarm and see how it goes. CLICK HERE to go to her tutorial.

I’ve had my Kindle Fire for a year, but am just now finding ways to use it that are fun for me. Did you know that not only can you get quilting books on the Kindle, but you can also get your Quilting Arts subscription on your Kindle now. Actually, it’s probably been around awhile, and I just didn’t realize it. And if you have an iPad or Android tablet, there are Kindle apps for them that work just like the Kindle.

And last, but not least, our little Ezri is growing up. I am managing the blog for the Hope for Hypothalamic Hamartoma Foundation, and my daughter has been telling Ezri’s story there. There are also blog posts about Faith, a little girl from England who is about six months younger than Ezri. Today’s post is about Ezri’s school trip to the Pumpkin Patch, and it’s a happy story.

http://www.ohfransson.com/oh_fransson/2012/10/how-to-make-quilted-panels-for-a-structured-bag.html 
 

Connector Block Tutorial for Halloween / Turtle Quilt

It’s raining cats and dogs here today – and more rain is on the way. It’s the sort of day that would be nice to curl up  and just knit or read a book all day. But I promised a tutorial for this quilt so here are the instructions for the connector block. This is an image of the connector block with fabric.

 This is the block showing the piecing:

These are the cutting instructions using the EDeN™ System.

Fabric Unit # # Needed per Block EDeN™ Number # Needed for Quilt
Light A 2 REC-1½ x 8 26
Light B 2 REC-1½x5 26
Light D 1 SQ-2 13
Dark B 2 REC-1½x5 26
Dark C 2 REC-1½x2 26

EDeN Numbers give the shape and size for cutting. All numbers given are finished sizes. Cut sizes should be 1/2” larger than the number given, i.e., 1½x8 should be cut as 2 x 8½. The abbreviations used here are: REC = rectangle; SQ = square

You can find more information about the EDeN system on the website.

This is the way that I would cut this block. I am going to tell you as a narrative without illlustrations, so I hope it is understandable. If not, please ask questions.

Light Fabric:

For the A unit, I would cut an 8 ½ ” strip across the width of fabric. This is an 8 ½ x 40” strip. Then I would fanfold that strip across the 2” strip die. This would yield 18-20 A units. I would repeat this step to make the remaining A units. Note that you do not need to fanfold the entire strip this time as you only need 6-8 more units.

But this leaves a strip that is now 8½ x approximately 24 inches. I would cut this to 5 ½  x 24” and fanfold it across the 2” strip die to cut 11 B units. Then I would cut a 5 ½” strip across the width of fabric and fanfold that across the 2” strip die. This will make 18-20 B units and with the ones that you cut previously, you will now have all the B units.

The D unit is the last unit of the light fabric and it can be cut entirely on the 2 ½” strip die. Cut 2 strips that are width of fabric on the 2 ½” strip cutter and then fanfold those 2 ½” strips across the strip die to make squares.

Dark Fabric:

Cut the B units as described above leaving the 5 ½ x 24” leftover from the second strip to be cut down and used for the C units.

The C units are cut 1 ½ x width of fabric (1 ½ x 40”) and then fanfold across the 2” strip die. 
 

ITH Mug Rug Tutorial

Mug rugs have become a fun and expressive outlet for quilters’ creativity. For me, they’re also a great way to practice free motion quilting, and they make wonderful gifts. So when I saw some mug rugs for embroidery machines that were done “in-the-hoop”, it piqued my interest. However, after seeing that the finished edge was a satin stitch, I was less interested because it would mean using a water soluble stabilizer or having a trace of tear-away stabilizer showing on the edge of my satin stitch. Either way, it would look fine after washing a couple of times, but my preference is a finished seam edge on mug rugs and on placemats. And then I had a flash of inspiration and realized that it could be done. And now I want to share it with you.

After working for awhile on a square mug rug, I decided that I needed more space for the designs. Taking into consideration the balancing act in design between the most popular hoop sizes of 5″ x 7″ or 6″ x 8″ and spacing for the embroidery design, I ended up using a hoop size of 6″ x 8″ or 150 x 200 mm.

And for those without embroidery machines or without a larger hoop for their machines, one can simply embroider or piece or hand stitch a design and then use the instructions in this tutorial to stitch the mug rug seam on their sewing machine. Either way, it makes a great mug rug and is the perfect way to show off your free motion quilting designs.

Click HERE for the tutorial. I made it into an adobe pdf file rather than putting all the text and photos into this post.

See what cute mug rugs these are. And they’re made with the Accuquilt circle die and some cutouts:

Come back tomorrow  for an embroidery design giveaway–one design as a mug rug and the same design without the mug rug! 
 

Happy 4th of July and a few Circles

Hope everyone is having a Happy 4th of July here in the steaming hot USA. The last couple of days have only been in the upper 90’s here in North Carolina, but it seems hotter than our record 100+ temperatures of last week. I have spent the past few days working on a new machine embroidery set using my circle die and staying inside as much as possible.

There are two new machine embroidery sets using the Circle Die–and who doesn’t have a circle die? It is so wonderful to have perfectly cut circles every time.

I did something new that I thought I would share. It’s a way to reduce waste when cutting circles–and a picture is worth a thousand words.

Circle Die 2-3-5 inch circles

Use an 18 inch x 6 inch strip of fabric with fusible already pressed onto the wrong side. Leave the paper on the fusible until circles have been cut. 

 And here’s one of the designs from the Circle Flower Set I’m finishing today. You can also do this on your regular sewing machine using the applique stitch. Scroll all the way to the end to see this really fun flower made only from the small (2 inch) circle on the circle die.